BADER’s Kenton Kaufman recognized, again!

BADER’s Kenton Kaufman recognized, again!

*** The BADER Consortium’s scientific cores director, Kenton Kaufman, Ph.D., was recently honored with the 2014 Research Award at the 40th Academy Annual Meeting and Scientific Symposium of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists (AAOP). Here is a bit more info from the Mayo Clinic, where Kaufman is based: The award is intended to recognize members performing the most outstanding research in the field of orthotics and prosthetics. The research must have been documented and published or presented as a part of an Academy-sponsored scientific education program within the previous three years. About Dr. Kaufman Kenton Kaufman, Ph.D., joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in Rochester in 1996. He is a Consultant in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery with a joint appointment in the Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering. He holds the academic rank of Professor of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Kaufman is the Director of the Biomechanics-Motion Analysis Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, and he is recognized with the distinction of a named professorship, the W. Hall Wendel, Jr., Musculoskeletal Research Professorship. Dr. Kaufman is also a registered professional engineer. Dr. Kaufman’s research focus is on the biomechanics of human movement. He currently holds several grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense for projects aimed at improving the mobility of disabled individuals.  Dr. Kaufman has worked over the past two decades to advance both prosthetic and orthotic care. He is the co-inventor of the SensorWalk, a stance-control orthosis on the commercial market. He has also conducted research on microprocessor-controlled knees and provided testimony to the insurance industry, which resulted in reimbursement for...
Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

**** More than four years ago, Sgt. Michael Pride returned home from his duty with the Marine Corp. He’d been injured in Afghanistan after his Humvee rolled onto his arm. Worried the accident would end his career and stand between him and the athletic lifestyle he enjoyed, Pride got involved in the first Marine Corp Trials. Now in its 4th year, the 2014 Trials started March 4 and runs through tomorrow at Camp Pendleton. You can LiveStream events here. Over 300 wounded warriors from across the country and from Australia, Canada, France, Columbia and others are competing as four teams in seven sports, including basketball, track and field and archery. Some live with limb difference, while others cope with PTSD and other illnesses. To learn more, and to see a video with Sgt. Pride – now an assistant Trials coach – check out this NBC News...
University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

  ***** At BADER, our priority is and always will ultimately lie with our soldiers and veterans who live with musculoskeletal challenges. But we also like to hear about other ways our veterans are being served. While BADER is a national consortium of researchers and affiliates throughout the country, its home base is at the University of Delaware, in the small city of Newark (unlike the city in New Jersey, the town is pronounced “New Ark”). Delaware is tiny;  there are fewer than 1 million people in the state, which is only 96 miles long and 35 miles across at its widest point. Sometimes, Delaware is more like a big small town. People look after people and everyone seems to know everyone. Forget six degrees of separation; here, it’s more like two. So it makes sense that, in 2009, a nursing student at the University of Delaware decided to create an organization intended to look after people in Newark too sick to fully look after themselves. It was inspired by her own experience. Sarah LaFave was a freshman in high school when her mother succumbed to breast cancer. Sarah saw the toll her mother’s illness took on the family, though they had tremendous support from other family and friends, and how difficult it could be to manage even the simplest of daily tasks. So she created Lori’s Hands, a group of volunteer men and women from UD who work with patients living with cancer and chronic disease. The students visit homes, grocery shop, mow lawns and complete other tasks at the request of the people they assist. Recently, the...
Wounded warriors summit Mt. Kilimanjaro

Wounded warriors summit Mt. Kilimanjaro

Last month, a group of once-and-current U.S. soldiers summited the highest point in Africa, Uhuru Peak, on Mt. Kilimanjaro. At 19,340 feet, the mountain is sometimes called the “roof of Africa.” It’s one of the world’s Seven Summits. Summiting Kilimanjaro, in and of itself, is not a terribly demanding feat, despite high altitude and low temperatures near the top. In 2012, nearly 52,000 people hiked the mountain. But what made this particular climb remarkable was who completed it. Six of the soldiers were wounded warriors, lower limb amputees. They call themselves the Kilimanjaro Warriors. They have a blog, which details their preparation and their journey, and a Facebook page, complete with updates, photos and more. A documentary of their 8-day ascent up the world’s largest free-standing mountain is in the works. Recently, ABC News covered the Kilimanjaro Warriors. That story can be found here and a gallery of their photos can be found here. The feat accomplished by these wounded warriors serves to show how much life our soldiers have left to live even in the face of limb difference. It also serves to show how important it is that we continue to conduct research and develop new and better ways to serve them well into the future. One of the climbers, Sergeant Kisha Makerney, Army National Guard, lost her leg in a motorcycle accident on break from her first tour of Iraq. She soon returned for a second tour, becoming the first female amputee to return to combat. Steve Martin served as a military policeman, spending eight years on active duty and in the national guard. In 2008, Martin’s...