Boston Marathon Bombings – One Year Later

Boston Marathon Bombings – One Year Later

***** The Boston Marathon. For runners around the world, it represents the pinnacle of the sport. It’s a lifetime achievement to qualify and an honor to run the epic 26.2 miles from Hopkinton to Boyleston, past the screaming girls of Wellesley and the hills of Newton. One word can describe it: electrifying. Last year, however, the outcome of the day was nothing but terrifying, as homemade bombs exploded at the finish, killing three and wounding 264 others. In the 365 days that have followed, people have come together to support the victims and their families as they grip with tragic losses and lives forever changed. The Spaulding Rehabilitation Center, a BADER Consortium clinical rehabilitation site in the Boston area, has been at the forefront of helping people impacted by the tragedy resume lives that are as close to normal as possible. Since last year, they have cared for 33 survivors, including 15 amputees. This has long been the goal of BADER and the work is no less important in the civilian population than it is for our wounded warriors. While we would prefer never to see such tragedies again, this serves as a good reminder why this ongoing work is crucial. People will always be in need of solid research and technology to keep pace with a changing world and to maintain a high quality of life. Recently, Spaulding announced it has launched a 10-year study to better understand how to help people impacted by such traumatic events as bombings and mass casualties. From the Boston Herald: Doctors will look at physical health, mental health, employment, relationships and more. They will...
Running on research

Running on research

  ***** Imagine waking up one day and being somewhere other than where you’d thought you’d be. Now imagine waking up in this strange place and realizing it’s a room in a hospital. And you’ve lost your leg. From the hip down. That’s what happened to Army Sergeant Jay Fain in 2007, the day before a scheduled two-week  break from a tour in Iraq. Fain shared his story recently with oandp.com, an online site for orthotics and prosthetics information, because shortly after he lost his leg, Fain became an unlikely runner. You should read his story, which can be found here. After losing a leg at the hip, running is nearly impossible. But Fain was sent to BADER MTF Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC)/Center for the Intrepid (CFI) for rehab. At CFI, he learned how to walk on a mechanical hip joint, the Össur Total Knee® and a basic foot. He gait trained, attended Össur Amputee Running and Mobility Clinics hosted by the Challenged Athletes Foundation and relying on the latest research and expertise of certified prosthetist Bobby Latham, made sure his hip fit just right. Then, Fain found a knew knee, hip and foot: Össur POWER KNEE™, an Ottobock Helix hip joint and an Össur Re-Flex Rotate™ foot. After several rounds of trial and error, Fain was fitted a fixed hip joint, the Össur Total Knee 2100 and an Össur Flex-Run™ foot. Fain had some physical abilities that made his return to running remarkable, yet possible. But without the hard work of researchers, physical therapists, orthotists and prosthetists and others willing to put in the time to improving the quality of life for people...

After the Wars

Today, the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation published a body of work in which they examined the experiences of men and women who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. You can see the stories, the graphics, the polls and more here and here. Even after our troops come home, the wars may always be with...
Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

  **** They started on Sunday, March 23. Two hundred wounded warriors and their supporters gathered in Houston to ride 450 miles over the course of six days. For many, it was a journey on the path to healing. The riders were part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Texas Challenge that ended in Arlington on March 28 at AT&T Stadium, to a crowd of NFL players ready to cheer them to the finish. The majority of the riders were part of Project HERO, a program that uses cycling to help injured veterans on the road to mental and physical rehabilitation. President and founder of Ride 2 Recovery, John Wordin, told the Wall Street Journal there are 43 such programs, which feed into Ride 2 Recovery, at military bases and VAs across the U.S.. Project HERO was actually started in 2010 at BADER military treatment facility, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This year was the first time the ride — which is one of six such challenges across the U.S. and in Normandy, France — started in Houston. Ride 2 Recovery documented each day in a series of daily newsletters, summaries of which follow: On Day 1, cyclists rode through towns that fully supported them, lining the streets and cheering them on. The ride ended at College Station, Aggieland, an 85-mile trek. On Day 2, Century Day, the riders completed the longest distance of the challenge — 100 miles — on the road from College Station to Georgetown. It was also Project HERO Day, which honored those participating in the program. ______ The organization highlighted in its newsletter one...