What BADER does

What BADER does

We’ve already told you about the history of BADER Consortium, including the way the name plays off the heroism of Sir Douglas Bader, a Royal Air Force fighter who lost both legs in a plane crash. He not only continued to fly during World War II, he shot down 22 German planes before being taken as a prisoner of war. Now we’re going to share how BADER Consortium – which stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation – aims to help today’s wounded military not only recover from their limb injuries but live a life as full as possible. That means making sure injured and recovering warriors are not just getting around with their prostheses, but finding their optimal level of function, whether that’s returning to active duty, running or competing against other athletes with limb loss. The goal of BADER – funded through a five-year, $19.7 million medical research grant from the Department of Defense – is to continue the advancements in the treatment of military amputees and create a culture of research in musculoskeletal trauma and limb loss across the the participating institutions. To do that, BADER works with four military treatment facilities to strengthen evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation care. They are: San Antonio Military Medical Center/Center for the Intrepid in San Antonio, Tex.; Naval Medical Center San Diego in California; Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. In addition, BADER is partnering with six clinical rehabilitation sites: Spaulding National Running Center in Cambridge, Mass.; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn; the University of Delaware; the University of Texas...
Boston Marathon Bombings – One Year Later

Boston Marathon Bombings – One Year Later

***** The Boston Marathon. For runners around the world, it represents the pinnacle of the sport. It’s a lifetime achievement to qualify and an honor to run the epic 26.2 miles from Hopkinton to Boyleston, past the screaming girls of Wellesley and the hills of Newton. One word can describe it: electrifying. Last year, however, the outcome of the day was nothing but terrifying, as homemade bombs exploded at the finish, killing three and wounding 264 others. In the 365 days that have followed, people have come together to support the victims and their families as they grip with tragic losses and lives forever changed. The Spaulding Rehabilitation Center, a BADER Consortium clinical rehabilitation site in the Boston area, has been at the forefront of helping people impacted by the tragedy resume lives that are as close to normal as possible. Since last year, they have cared for 33 survivors, including 15 amputees. This has long been the goal of BADER and the work is no less important in the civilian population than it is for our wounded warriors. While we would prefer never to see such tragedies again, this serves as a good reminder why this ongoing work is crucial. People will always be in need of solid research and technology to keep pace with a changing world and to maintain a high quality of life. Recently, Spaulding announced it has launched a 10-year study to better understand how to help people impacted by such traumatic events as bombings and mass casualties. From the Boston Herald: Doctors will look at physical health, mental health, employment, relationships and more. They will...