The BADER Consortium collaborates on another Military Medicine supplement

The BADER Consortium collaborates on another Military Medicine supplement

For the second time this year, the BADER Consortium has collaborated with other military health organizations to produce a special supplement to Military Medicine, the International Journal of AMSUS. The issue, “Raising the Bar: Extremity Trauma Care,” was produced in partnership with the Think Lead and Innovate Foundation (TLIF), the Extremity Trauma and Amputation Center of Excellence (EACE) and the Center for Rehabilitation Sciences Research (CRSR). It focuses on the collaboration and innovation that is taking place in today’s military health system. Today’s wounded soldiers have access to cutting-edge medical care, technology and research efforts in the seconds following their injury, making it possible to reach optimal outcomes for this high-performing group. This kind of success is the result in part of a synergistic approach taken by BADER, the EACE and CRSR to identify and develop research capabilities that translate advances into clinical care. The 80-page supplement highlights the many examples of how military health professionals are “raising the bar” when it comes to finding ways to work together to address the complex needs of combat wounded soldiers. The issue includes an article about the BADER Consortium and how it relies on strong partnerships with military treatment facilities (MTFs) to strengthen and support orthopaedic rehabilitation research. You also can read about some of the latest research taking place at these MTFs. The BADER Consortium is proud to be part of the effort to help wounded service members return to their highest level of function following a traumatic limb injury. This supplement provides a snapshot of the ways our University of Delaware staff, funded through BADER, are making a difference....
David Tulsky joins University of Delaware

David Tulsky joins University of Delaware

David Tulsky, an expert in outcomes assessment research and measurement of cognitive functioning in individuals with neurological impairment, has joined the faculty in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Delaware. Tulsky, who was formerly Irving Geist Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, will provide support to a broad range of programs including the BADER Consortium and the Center for Translational Research ACCEL Program. “David Tulsky is a very significant hire for the ACCEL program, the University of Delaware, and the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance for our partners in the biomedical community in Delaware,” said Kathleen Matt, dean of UD’s College of Health Sciences and executive director of the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance (DHSA). “David’s expertise in outcomes research will bridge our academic and clinical institutions and will help facilitate translation of interdisciplinary research into diagnostics, evaluation, and interventions that maximize health outcomes in our community. “ Tulsky’s hiring by the Department of Physical Therapyis the first step toward the establishment of a Center for Assessment Research and Translation at UD. “We want to change and improve the way outcomes measurement is being done in medicine and especially in rehabilitation,” Tulsky said. “The University of Delaware offers a fantastic opportunity to really build an entity across multiple colleges and departments.” Stuart Binder-McLeod, director of the ACCEL Program, said Tulsky is a nationally recognized expert in the analysis of clinical outcomes data, particularly for underrepresented populations, including racial minorities and people with physical and neurological disabilities. “We’re really excited to have him here at Delaware to provide assessment tools for a variety of...
Aiming for optimal function

Aiming for optimal function

  Ashly Ash had her right leg amputated when she was 4 years old after being diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer. For much of her life she has used a prosthesis, though it’s been a challenge to find one that’s comfortable and lasting. Now, BADER Consortium and Independence Prosthetics-Orthotics are teaming up to help fit the 29-year-old Pennsylvania woman with a specialized prosthesis that provides optimal function and support for her unique type of limb loss. They are doing it with Oklahoma City prosthetist Jay Martin, who has developed a lightweight hip socket device that gives higher-level amputees like Ash more control and comfort. Martin will help the staff at Independence create a better-fitting prosthesis for Ash. She will be casted and a prosthesis developed from the mold. He also will create a diagnostic socket that should be more aligned to her body. After that, Ash will head to the BADER laboratory on the University of Delaware’s Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus. There, she will walk on the split-belt instrumented treadmill and have her movements captured and analyzed to test the final product. It’s a complicated task with one extra wrinkle — the entire project is slated to be completed in less than 48 hours. “It’s amazing to me. It’s a huge opportunity,” said Ash, 29, who initially made contact with the BADER Consortium after hearing about it from her aunt, who works at UD. BADER supports orthopedic research to help service members with limb loss or limb difference return to optimal function. It is funded through a $19.7 million Department of Defense grant....
Delaware veteran wins at Invictus

Delaware veteran wins at Invictus

Yesterday marked the start of the first-ever Invictus Games, an international sporting competition for wounded warriors taking place at Olympic Stadium in London, England. And in the first day of competition, Felton, Del., resident Nicholas Dadgostar showed off the power of Team USA, winning a silver medal in the men’s 200 meters, competing against other athletes with single or double amputations below the knee. He also finished fourth in the 100 meters. “So, not a bad day,” Dadgostar, a retired Air Force staff sergeant, posted on Facebook along with a photo of his medal. More than 400 athletes from 14 countries – including 98 from the United States – are competing in nine Paralympic-like events, including swimming, track and field, seated volleyball, wheelchair basketball and wheelchair rugby. The competition, which runs through Sunday, has drawn accolades from around the globe.  It was organized by Great Britain’s own Prince Harry, who has said he hopes to make the event an international version of the Wounded Warrior games held in the U.S. It’s a surreal experience for Dadgostar, whose right leg was amputated below the knee following an accident in 2009 while on active duty in the Air Force. In addition to competing in track and field, he also is playing on the seated volleyball team. “I’m ecstatic to be part of this. Everybody told me at the time, all the doctors, they said, ‘Don’t expect anything,’” said Dadgostar, 32. “I can do everything I did before.” Dadgostar and his fellow competitors represent an elite group – athletes who have not only served their country, but have recovered from some pretty...
Yes You Can Golf Classic slated for July 21st

Yes You Can Golf Classic slated for July 21st

We can’t help but share this news posted today by UDaily, the University of Delaware’s online news service. Read on… Yes U Can USA Paralympic Sport Delaware will hold the Yes U Can USA Golf Classic on Monday, July 21, at the DuPont Country Club, in Wilmington, Delaware. The tournament will be played on the signature championship DuPont Course, formerly the home course for the LPGA McDonald’s Championship. Tournament games will include closest to the pin, longest drive, mulligans for sale, and rent-the-pro for your tee shot. Special guests will include former NFL player Kevin Reilly, a cancer survivor, amputee, and motivational speaker, as well as Steven Stanhope, director of the BADER Consortium at the University of Delaware, which brings together experts from across the country to establish evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation for wounded warriors. “We want to emphasize that this event offers something for everyone — golfers and non-golfers, amputees and non-amputees,” says Yes U Can co-founder Vickie George. “Those who don’t want to play golf can join us for the dinner and auction. Another great non-golf activity is ‘Putt & Pinot on the Green-gio,’ which is being organized by Lisa Ramone.” The event will also include a classic car show, instruction by LPGA professional Rebecca Dengler, and adapted golf instruction by Bob Buck, founder and executive director of the Eastern Amputee Golf Association (EAGA). Player registration fees are $125 for EAGA members and $150 for others. Fees include golf, driving range, gift bag, lunch, beverages and dinner. Sponsor opportunities are available at all levels from gifts for the silent auction to title sponsorship. Click here to go directly to...