What BADER does

What BADER does

We’ve already told you about the history of BADER Consortium, including the way the name plays off the heroism of Sir Douglas Bader, a Royal Air Force fighter who lost both legs in a plane crash. He not only continued to fly during World War II, he shot down 22 German planes before being taken as a prisoner of war. Now we’re going to share how BADER Consortium – which stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation – aims to help today’s wounded military not only recover from their limb injuries but live a life as full as possible. That means making sure injured and recovering warriors are not just getting around with their prostheses, but finding their optimal level of function, whether that’s returning to active duty, running or competing against other athletes with limb loss. The goal of BADER – funded through a five-year, $19.7 million medical research grant from the Department of Defense – is to continue the advancements in the treatment of military amputees and create a culture of research in musculoskeletal trauma and limb loss across the the participating institutions. To do that, BADER works with four military treatment facilities to strengthen evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation care. They are: San Antonio Military Medical Center/Center for the Intrepid in San Antonio, Tex.; Naval Medical Center San Diego in California; Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. In addition, BADER is partnering with six clinical rehabilitation sites: Spaulding National Running Center in Cambridge, Mass.; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn; the University of Delaware; the University of Texas...
University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

  ***** At BADER, our priority is and always will ultimately lie with our soldiers and veterans who live with musculoskeletal challenges. But we also like to hear about other ways our veterans are being served. While BADER is a national consortium of researchers and affiliates throughout the country, its home base is at the University of Delaware, in the small city of Newark (unlike the city in New Jersey, the town is pronounced “New Ark”). Delaware is tiny;  there are fewer than 1 million people in the state, which is only 96 miles long and 35 miles across at its widest point. Sometimes, Delaware is more like a big small town. People look after people and everyone seems to know everyone. Forget six degrees of separation; here, it’s more like two. So it makes sense that, in 2009, a nursing student at the University of Delaware decided to create an organization intended to look after people in Newark too sick to fully look after themselves. It was inspired by her own experience. Sarah LaFave was a freshman in high school when her mother succumbed to breast cancer. Sarah saw the toll her mother’s illness took on the family, though they had tremendous support from other family and friends, and how difficult it could be to manage even the simplest of daily tasks. So she created Lori’s Hands, a group of volunteer men and women from UD who work with patients living with cancer and chronic disease. The students visit homes, grocery shop, mow lawns and complete other tasks at the request of the people they assist. Recently, the...