What BADER does

What BADER does

We’ve already told you about the history of BADER Consortium, including the way the name plays off the heroism of Sir Douglas Bader, a Royal Air Force fighter who lost both legs in a plane crash. He not only continued to fly during World War II, he shot down 22 German planes before being taken as a prisoner of war. Now we’re going to share how BADER Consortium – which stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation – aims to help today’s wounded military not only recover from their limb injuries but live a life as full as possible. That means making sure injured and recovering warriors are not just getting around with their prostheses, but finding their optimal level of function, whether that’s returning to active duty, running or competing against other athletes with limb loss. The goal of BADER – funded through a five-year, $19.7 million medical research grant from the Department of Defense – is to continue the advancements in the treatment of military amputees and create a culture of research in musculoskeletal trauma and limb loss across the the participating institutions. To do that, BADER works with four military treatment facilities to strengthen evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation care. They are: San Antonio Military Medical Center/Center for the Intrepid in San Antonio, Tex.; Naval Medical Center San Diego in California; Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. In addition, BADER is partnering with six clinical rehabilitation sites: Spaulding National Running Center in Cambridge, Mass.; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn; the University of Delaware; the University of Texas...
A history of looking ahead

A history of looking ahead

***** Have you ever put much thought into the first prosthesis? Have you ever thought about the people who came before, who lived with limb loss and no alternatives, who dealt with the prejudices and shame of their condition because of a lack of understanding and acceptance? A fascinating article from Gizmodo earlier this month looks at the history of prosthetics and artificial limbs, tracing the history of some of the pioneers who first made strides in developing better prosthetics. According to the article, amputation was one of the first-recorded surgeries, mentioned in the 4th century BC in “On Joints,” one of the writings of Hippocrates (ever heard of the Hippocratic oath?). Improvements in preventing blood loss made amputation possible, so patients didn’t bleed to death as a result of the procedure. In more modern times, further medical improvements – including the use of pain-relieving measures and anesthesia, plus infection prevention  – allowed amputations to become more commonplace when limbs could not be saved. Stewart Emmens, the curator of Community Health at the Science Museum in London, told Gizmodo: “The control of a number of associated factors–blood loss, pain, and infection prevention–has been key to greatly improving the survival chances of the amputee . . . Then, as now, the procedure was often viewed as a failure of treatment.” Some of the earliest prosthetics were constructed of wood and metal. They were heavy, stiff and cumbersome. Some made movements difficult and noisy. But they could still be life-changers. James Edward Hangar was an 18-year-old Confederate soldier in the Civil War when his left leg was irreparably damaged by a cannonball launched by Union soldiers. He was...
Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

  **** They started on Sunday, March 23. Two hundred wounded warriors and their supporters gathered in Houston to ride 450 miles over the course of six days. For many, it was a journey on the path to healing. The riders were part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Texas Challenge that ended in Arlington on March 28 at AT&T Stadium, to a crowd of NFL players ready to cheer them to the finish. The majority of the riders were part of Project HERO, a program that uses cycling to help injured veterans on the road to mental and physical rehabilitation. President and founder of Ride 2 Recovery, John Wordin, told the Wall Street Journal there are 43 such programs, which feed into Ride 2 Recovery, at military bases and VAs across the U.S.. Project HERO was actually started in 2010 at BADER military treatment facility, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This year was the first time the ride — which is one of six such challenges across the U.S. and in Normandy, France — started in Houston. Ride 2 Recovery documented each day in a series of daily newsletters, summaries of which follow: On Day 1, cyclists rode through towns that fully supported them, lining the streets and cheering them on. The ride ended at College Station, Aggieland, an 85-mile trek. On Day 2, Century Day, the riders completed the longest distance of the challenge — 100 miles — on the road from College Station to Georgetown. It was also Project HERO Day, which honored those participating in the program. ______ The organization highlighted in its newsletter one...
Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

**** More than four years ago, Sgt. Michael Pride returned home from his duty with the Marine Corp. He’d been injured in Afghanistan after his Humvee rolled onto his arm. Worried the accident would end his career and stand between him and the athletic lifestyle he enjoyed, Pride got involved in the first Marine Corp Trials. Now in its 4th year, the 2014 Trials started March 4 and runs through tomorrow at Camp Pendleton. You can LiveStream events here. Over 300 wounded warriors from across the country and from Australia, Canada, France, Columbia and others are competing as four teams in seven sports, including basketball, track and field and archery. Some live with limb difference, while others cope with PTSD and other illnesses. To learn more, and to see a video with Sgt. Pride – now an assistant Trials coach – check out this NBC News...
University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

University of Delaware students help a WWII veteran

  ***** At BADER, our priority is and always will ultimately lie with our soldiers and veterans who live with musculoskeletal challenges. But we also like to hear about other ways our veterans are being served. While BADER is a national consortium of researchers and affiliates throughout the country, its home base is at the University of Delaware, in the small city of Newark (unlike the city in New Jersey, the town is pronounced “New Ark”). Delaware is tiny;  there are fewer than 1 million people in the state, which is only 96 miles long and 35 miles across at its widest point. Sometimes, Delaware is more like a big small town. People look after people and everyone seems to know everyone. Forget six degrees of separation; here, it’s more like two. So it makes sense that, in 2009, a nursing student at the University of Delaware decided to create an organization intended to look after people in Newark too sick to fully look after themselves. It was inspired by her own experience. Sarah LaFave was a freshman in high school when her mother succumbed to breast cancer. Sarah saw the toll her mother’s illness took on the family, though they had tremendous support from other family and friends, and how difficult it could be to manage even the simplest of daily tasks. So she created Lori’s Hands, a group of volunteer men and women from UD who work with patients living with cancer and chronic disease. The students visit homes, grocery shop, mow lawns and complete other tasks at the request of the people they assist. Recently, the...