Who is BADER?

Who is BADER?

You probably already have a pretty good idea who we are, if you’ve played around on the website (if you haven’t, well, you’re not allowed to leave until you do!). But we think there is more you might like to know. The BADER Consortium got started a few years ago, in 2011, when the United States Department of Defense gave a $19.5 million award to the University of Delaware, under the leadership of Dr. Steven Stanhope. The vision was to help military treatment facilities working with soldiers injured in combat engage in high-quality, evidence-based research that would truly have an impact on the lives of wounded warriors. Through funding research and facilitating partnerships between military and civilian sites and with private industry, BADER’s goals remain the same today: help wounded warriors live their lives as fully as possible. The name BADER is actually a play on words. It stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation, which is exactly what the Consortium aims to do. But the acronym was actually chosen because of WHO it represents. Sir Douglas Bader was born in 1910, in St. John’s Wood, London. An athlete, Bader won a scholarship at the age of 18 to the Royal Air Force (RAF) College at Cranwell, where he excelled in rugby, shooting, hockey, athletics, boxing and cricket. He showed talent for acrobatics and performed in aerial shows for the RAF. But on December 14, 1931, Bader crashed and ultimately lost both legs. Within six months, he was on prosthetics, walking unaided and determined to fly again. Initially turned down by the RAF when he tried to return, by...
What BADER does

What BADER does

June 2014 Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation (BADER) – aims to help today’s wounded military not only recover from their limb injuries but live a life as full as possible. That means making sure injured and recovering warriors are not just getting around with their prostheses, but finding their optimal level of function, whether that’s returning to active duty, running or competing against other athletes with limb loss. The goal of BADER – funded through a five-year, $19.7 million medical research grant from the Department of Defense – is to continue the advancements in the treatment of military amputees and create a culture of research in musculoskeletal trauma and limb loss across the the participating institutions. To do that, BADER works with four military treatment facilities to strengthen evidence-based orthopedic rehabilitation care. They are: San Antonio Military Medical Center/Center for the Intrepid in San Antonio, Tex.; Naval Medical Center San Diego in California; Naval Medical Center in Portsmouth, Va., and Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md. In addition, BADER is partnering with six clinical rehabilitation sites: Spaulding National Running Center in Cambridge, Mass.; Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn; the University of Delaware; the University of Texas at Austin, the Denver Rehabilitation Institute; and New York University. Why do this? For starters, these wounded warriors deserve it as thanks for the sacrifices they’ve made during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. More than 1,500 soldiers have suffered battle-related limb loss between 2001 through 2013 while serving in Operation New Dawn, Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. And while more soldiers are surviving in greater numbers...