The New Normal

The New Normal

It’s great to see so many people on social media giving thanks on Veterans Day for the service and sacrifice of strangers and loved ones who served in the military for our protection.  And while those accolades are important, it’s also critical that we make sure these brave men and women have access to state-of-the-art technology and treatment to ensure they are reaching the highest level of function possible. Veterans with traumatic limb loss are learning what it means to return to their work and home lives following an amputation. But they aren’t altering their life goals or downgrading their plans – rather, they are relying on state-of-the-art technology and advancements in patient care to help them reach optimal clinical outcomes, whether it’s running again or attending to activities of daily living. They are veterans like Travis Mills, a retired U.S. Army staff sergeant and one of five Afghanistan war veterans to survive a quadruple amputation. There’s many words to describe him, but one of the most powerful ones is runner. Fitted with specially made running blades, Mills can now run more 1 1/2 miles. He plans to do a 5K. In a story for Runner’s World, he describes his first experience on the blades this way:  “I was so excited to get running, I broke one in half one of the first times I put them on. I drove two hours that same day to get it replaced. I wanted to keep at it.” Mills is an example of a veteran seeking the highest level of function possible – a goal that should be the norm for all people with limb loss. It’s this “new normal” that offers...

After the Wars

Today, the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation published a body of work in which they examined the experiences of men and women who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. You can see the stories, the graphics, the polls and more here and here. Even after our troops come home, the wars may always be with...
Who is BADER?

Who is BADER?

You probably already have a pretty good idea who we are, if you’ve played around on the website (if you haven’t, well, you’re not allowed to leave until you do!). But we think there is more you might like to know. The BADER Consortium got started a few years ago, in 2011, when the United States Department of Defense gave a $19.5 million award to the University of Delaware, under the leadership of Dr. Steven Stanhope. The vision was to help military treatment facilities working with soldiers injured in combat engage in high-quality, evidence-based research that would truly have an impact on the lives of wounded warriors. Through funding research and facilitating partnerships between military and civilian sites and with private industry, BADER’s goals remain the same today: help wounded warriors live their lives as fully as possible. The name BADER is actually a play on words. It stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation, which is exactly what the Consortium aims to do. But the acronym was actually chosen because of WHO it represents. Sir Douglas Bader was born in 1910, in St. John’s Wood, London. An athlete, Bader won a scholarship at the age of 18 to the Royal Air Force (RAF) College at Cranwell, where he excelled in rugby, shooting, hockey, athletics, boxing and cricket. He showed talent for acrobatics and performed in aerial shows for the RAF. But on December 14, 1931, Bader crashed and ultimately lost both legs. Within six months, he was on prosthetics, walking unaided and determined to fly again. Initially turned down by the RAF when he tried to return, by...