Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

  **** They started on Sunday, March 23. Two hundred wounded warriors and their supporters gathered in Houston to ride 450 miles over the course of six days. For many, it was a journey on the path to healing. The riders were part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Texas Challenge that ended in Arlington on March 28 at AT&T Stadium, to a crowd of NFL players ready to cheer them to the finish. The majority of the riders were part of Project HERO, a program that uses cycling to help injured veterans on the road to mental and physical rehabilitation. President and founder of Ride 2 Recovery, John Wordin, told the Wall Street Journal there are 43 such programs, which feed into Ride 2 Recovery, at military bases and VAs across the U.S.. Project HERO was actually started in 2010 at BADER military treatment facility, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This year was the first time the ride — which is one of six such challenges across the U.S. and in Normandy, France — started in Houston. Ride 2 Recovery documented each day in a series of daily newsletters, summaries of which follow: On Day 1, cyclists rode through towns that fully supported them, lining the streets and cheering them on. The ride ended at College Station, Aggieland, an 85-mile trek. On Day 2, Century Day, the riders completed the longest distance of the challenge — 100 miles — on the road from College Station to Georgetown. It was also Project HERO Day, which honored those participating in the program. ______ The organization highlighted in its newsletter one...
BADER’s Kenton Kaufman recognized, again!

BADER’s Kenton Kaufman recognized, again!

*** The BADER Consortium’s scientific cores director, Kenton Kaufman, Ph.D., was recently honored with the 2014 Research Award at the 40th Academy Annual Meeting and Scientific Symposium of the American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists (AAOP). Here is a bit more info from the Mayo Clinic, where Kaufman is based: The award is intended to recognize members performing the most outstanding research in the field of orthotics and prosthetics. The research must have been documented and published or presented as a part of an Academy-sponsored scientific education program within the previous three years. About Dr. Kaufman Kenton Kaufman, Ph.D., joined the staff of Mayo Clinic in Rochester in 1996. He is a Consultant in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery with a joint appointment in the Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering. He holds the academic rank of Professor of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Kaufman is the Director of the Biomechanics-Motion Analysis Laboratory at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, and he is recognized with the distinction of a named professorship, the W. Hall Wendel, Jr., Musculoskeletal Research Professorship. Dr. Kaufman is also a registered professional engineer. Dr. Kaufman’s research focus is on the biomechanics of human movement. He currently holds several grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense for projects aimed at improving the mobility of disabled individuals.  Dr. Kaufman has worked over the past two decades to advance both prosthetic and orthotic care. He is the co-inventor of the SensorWalk, a stance-control orthosis on the commercial market. He has also conducted research on microprocessor-controlled knees and provided testimony to the insurance industry, which resulted in reimbursement for...
Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

Wounded warriors compete in Marine Corp Trials in San Diego

**** More than four years ago, Sgt. Michael Pride returned home from his duty with the Marine Corp. He’d been injured in Afghanistan after his Humvee rolled onto his arm. Worried the accident would end his career and stand between him and the athletic lifestyle he enjoyed, Pride got involved in the first Marine Corp Trials. Now in its 4th year, the 2014 Trials started March 4 and runs through tomorrow at Camp Pendleton. You can LiveStream events here. Over 300 wounded warriors from across the country and from Australia, Canada, France, Columbia and others are competing as four teams in seven sports, including basketball, track and field and archery. Some live with limb difference, while others cope with PTSD and other illnesses. To learn more, and to see a video with Sgt. Pride – now an assistant Trials coach – check out this NBC News...
Who is BADER?

Who is BADER?

You probably already have a pretty good idea who we are, if you’ve played around on the website (if you haven’t, well, you’re not allowed to leave until you do!). But we think there is more you might like to know. The BADER Consortium got started a few years ago, in 2011, when the United States Department of Defense gave a $19.5 million award to the University of Delaware, under the leadership of Dr. Steven Stanhope. The vision was to help military treatment facilities working with soldiers injured in combat engage in high-quality, evidence-based research that would truly have an impact on the lives of wounded warriors. Through funding research and facilitating partnerships between military and civilian sites and with private industry, BADER’s goals remain the same today: help wounded warriors live their lives as fully as possible. The name BADER is actually a play on words. It stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation, which is exactly what the Consortium aims to do. But the acronym was actually chosen because of WHO it represents. Sir Douglas Bader was born in 1910, in St. John’s Wood, London. An athlete, Bader won a scholarship at the age of 18 to the Royal Air Force (RAF) College at Cranwell, where he excelled in rugby, shooting, hockey, athletics, boxing and cricket. He showed talent for acrobatics and performed in aerial shows for the RAF. But on December 14, 1931, Bader crashed and ultimately lost both legs. Within six months, he was on prosthetics, walking unaided and determined to fly again. Initially turned down by the RAF when he tried to return, by...