AMSUS 2015

AMSUS 2015

Members of the BADER Consortium are in San Antonio, Tex., this week for the 2015 AMSUS Continuing Education meeting, where federal and military health professionals are discussing how healthcare is flexing to meet the changing needs of its patients. The conference features top leadership from the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, Defense Health Agency and others talking about health and scientific issues under the theme, “The New Normal.” AMSUS is a non-profit organization for federal and international health professionals that helps advance healthcare knowledge and effectiveness among its members. It includes the uniformed services along with the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. David Shulkin, Under Secretary of Health for the VA, will provide an update on the current and future state of the VA and also describe his vision for veterans’ healthcare. Medical and clinical operations, global health, and military health system updates are among the educational tracks. In addition, BADER Consortium is co-sponsoring the WARRIOR Symposium, a preliminary session that will be held from 1-5:30 p.m. today. The symposium will discuss rehabilitation needs for servicemembers and civilians following amputations or extremity trauma. WARRIOR stands for WARfighters Receiving Innovative Orthopedic Rehabilitation. The symposium is intended to offer a comprehensive look at the issue of orthopedic rehabilitation, from a military and civilian perspective. It will include a discussion of the findings of the Defense Health Board report issued earlier this year, which made recommendations for the sustainment and advancement of amputee care. Participants in the WARRIOR Symposium include Vice Admiral Raquel Bono, MD, director of the Defense Health Agency, discussing the “Roadmap for Change;” Maj. Gen. George Anderson,...
David Tulsky joins University of Delaware

David Tulsky joins University of Delaware

David Tulsky, an expert in outcomes assessment research and measurement of cognitive functioning in individuals with neurological impairment, has joined the faculty in the College of Health Sciences at the University of Delaware. Tulsky, who was formerly Irving Geist Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, will provide support to a broad range of programs including the BADER Consortium and the Center for Translational Research ACCEL Program. “David Tulsky is a very significant hire for the ACCEL program, the University of Delaware, and the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance for our partners in the biomedical community in Delaware,” said Kathleen Matt, dean of UD’s College of Health Sciences and executive director of the Delaware Health Sciences Alliance (DHSA). “David’s expertise in outcomes research will bridge our academic and clinical institutions and will help facilitate translation of interdisciplinary research into diagnostics, evaluation, and interventions that maximize health outcomes in our community. “ Tulsky’s hiring by the Department of Physical Therapyis the first step toward the establishment of a Center for Assessment Research and Translation at UD. “We want to change and improve the way outcomes measurement is being done in medicine and especially in rehabilitation,” Tulsky said. “The University of Delaware offers a fantastic opportunity to really build an entity across multiple colleges and departments.” Stuart Binder-McLeod, director of the ACCEL Program, said Tulsky is a nationally recognized expert in the analysis of clinical outcomes data, particularly for underrepresented populations, including racial minorities and people with physical and neurological disabilities. “We’re really excited to have him here at Delaware to provide assessment tools for a variety of...
Who is BADER?

Who is BADER?

You probably already have a pretty good idea who we are, if you’ve played around on the website (if you haven’t, well, you’re not allowed to leave until you do!). But we think there is more you might like to know. The BADER Consortium got started a few years ago, in 2011, when the United States Department of Defense gave a $19.5 million award to the University of Delaware, under the leadership of Dr. Steven Stanhope. The vision was to help military treatment facilities working with soldiers injured in combat engage in high-quality, evidence-based research that would truly have an impact on the lives of wounded warriors. Through funding research and facilitating partnerships between military and civilian sites and with private industry, BADER’s goals remain the same today: help wounded warriors live their lives as fully as possible. The name BADER is actually a play on words. It stands for Bridging Advanced Developments for Exceptional Rehabilitation, which is exactly what the Consortium aims to do. But the acronym was actually chosen because of WHO it represents. Sir Douglas Bader was born in 1910, in St. John’s Wood, London. An athlete, Bader won a scholarship at the age of 18 to the Royal Air Force (RAF) College at Cranwell, where he excelled in rugby, shooting, hockey, athletics, boxing and cricket. He showed talent for acrobatics and performed in aerial shows for the RAF. But on December 14, 1931, Bader crashed and ultimately lost both legs. Within six months, he was on prosthetics, walking unaided and determined to fly again. Initially turned down by the RAF when he tried to return, by...