AMSUS 2015

AMSUS 2015

Members of the BADER Consortium are in San Antonio, Tex., this week for the 2015 AMSUS Continuing Education meeting, where federal and military health professionals are discussing how healthcare is flexing to meet the changing needs of its patients. The conference features top leadership from the Department of Defense, Department of Veterans Affairs, Defense Health Agency and others talking about health and scientific issues under the theme, “The New Normal.” AMSUS is a non-profit organization for federal and international health professionals that helps advance healthcare knowledge and effectiveness among its members. It includes the uniformed services along with the Department of Veterans Affairs. Dr. David Shulkin, Under Secretary of Health for the VA, will provide an update on the current and future state of the VA and also describe his vision for veterans’ healthcare. Medical and clinical operations, global health, and military health system updates are among the educational tracks. In addition, BADER Consortium is co-sponsoring the WARRIOR Symposium, a preliminary session that will be held from 1-5:30 p.m. today. The symposium will discuss rehabilitation needs for servicemembers and civilians following amputations or extremity trauma. WARRIOR stands for WARfighters Receiving Innovative Orthopedic Rehabilitation. The symposium is intended to offer a comprehensive look at the issue of orthopedic rehabilitation, from a military and civilian perspective. It will include a discussion of the findings of the Defense Health Board report issued earlier this year, which made recommendations for the sustainment and advancement of amputee care. Participants in the WARRIOR Symposium include Vice Admiral Raquel Bono, MD, director of the Defense Health Agency, discussing the “Roadmap for Change;” Maj. Gen. George Anderson,...

After the Wars

Today, the Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation published a body of work in which they examined the experiences of men and women who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan. You can see the stories, the graphics, the polls and more here and here. Even after our troops come home, the wars may always be with...
Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

Wounded warriors cycle through Texas

  **** They started on Sunday, March 23. Two hundred wounded warriors and their supporters gathered in Houston to ride 450 miles over the course of six days. For many, it was a journey on the path to healing. The riders were part of the UnitedHealthcare Ride 2 Recovery Texas Challenge that ended in Arlington on March 28 at AT&T Stadium, to a crowd of NFL players ready to cheer them to the finish. The majority of the riders were part of Project HERO, a program that uses cycling to help injured veterans on the road to mental and physical rehabilitation. President and founder of Ride 2 Recovery, John Wordin, told the Wall Street Journal there are 43 such programs, which feed into Ride 2 Recovery, at military bases and VAs across the U.S.. Project HERO was actually started in 2010 at BADER military treatment facility, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. This year was the first time the ride — which is one of six such challenges across the U.S. and in Normandy, France — started in Houston. Ride 2 Recovery documented each day in a series of daily newsletters, summaries of which follow: On Day 1, cyclists rode through towns that fully supported them, lining the streets and cheering them on. The ride ended at College Station, Aggieland, an 85-mile trek. On Day 2, Century Day, the riders completed the longest distance of the challenge — 100 miles — on the road from College Station to Georgetown. It was also Project HERO Day, which honored those participating in the program. ______ The organization highlighted in its newsletter one...